Pablo Picasso Poster Blunder ‘Nude Woman in a Red Armchair’ at Edinburgh Airport

Roll the tape this week at Edinburgh Airport in Scotland  the arrivals area was throng with people and there was a whiff of expectation in  the air as travelers arrived to see a prominently positioned poster showcasing a classic Pablo Picasso art ‘Nude Woman in a Red Armchair’

Then the poster which was advertising the Picasso and Modern British Art exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, got a very welcome publicity boost. The story we have all be it second hand is that a Scottish woman saw the poster – was offended by what she saw – reported to Edinburgh Airport Authorities.  Then the poster was covered over with a plastic sheet – touché perfect for the ad company JC Decaux the papers and TV were all over the story and that kicked off  a viral surge of interest that will give a major boost  to the Picasso and Modern British Art exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.

Moving on 24  hours and the Edinburgh Airport Authorities wake up to the fact they have made a major publicity blunder in covering the Pablo Picasso nude poster of  ‘Nude Woman in a Red Armchair’ As usual another typical inappropriate display of self acclaimed responsible officials once again displaying  inability to even  manage the display of nude painting on a poster at Edinburgh Airport. Now the poster is back on full view and JC Decaux are simply delighted as the ad has been a viral sensation.

The Picasso and Modern British Art exhibition runs until 4 November 2012.

Pablo Picasso Poster Blunder ‘Nude Woman in a Red Armchair’ at Edinburgh Airport…

Legend
‘Nude Woman in a Red Armchair’
Pablo Picasso
1932
The painting shows a woman, naked except for a bead necklance, sitting in an armchair. As we look at the picture, the woman and the chair do not face us squarely, instead they are angled to our left. Her gaze does not meet ours but looks over our left shoulder. The woman’s left leg is crossed over her right. Her elbows rest on the arms of the chair and her head rests in her hands. The bottom of the canvas cuts her legs off above the knee. She fills the painting so that we see very little around her, except for a number of lines that we read as skirting boards and dado rails. – Attribution to Tate.Org.Uk

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